Nova Scotia cat litter can go in green compost bin

Nova Scotia cat litter can go in green compost bin

Cat owners served by Valley Waste Resource Management (VWRM) in Nova Scotia now have the option of putting used kitty litter in the green compost bin. They’ve been composting kitty litter in Colchester County for approximately a decade and Pictou County began doing so last year,” said VWRM communications manager Andrew Garrett.

Landfills are very expensive, use a lot of space and “they never go away.” Taking kitty litter out of landfills moves the material up on the so-called “waste hierarchy,” turning it into a resource as compost as opposed to a disposal item.

Here’s the scoop.

Be a pet poo recycling nerd (in a good way!)

With 83 million dogs and 96 million cats in the U.S. alone, pet waste is a serious problem, polluting land and waterways and contributing upwards of 10 million tons of material to landfills every year. For years we’ve been told not to recycle dog and cat waste. But the fact is that, with due diligence, there are many ways to take your pet to near zero waste by diverting his or her waste from landfills.

Now you can significantly reduce household waste by recycling your pet’s waste via The Pet Poo Guide: How to Compost and Recycle Pet Wastea must-read for pet owners concerned about the environmental impact of their best friend. This book offers step-by-step instructions for eight ways to recycle and practical advice on choosing which one is the best solution for you.

Are you ready to nudge your pets much, much closer to net zero waste?  Order your copy of the Guide today!

Today US dogs produce more waste than humans did in 1959

Much of the 11 million tons of dog waste generated in the U.S. each year is trashed and streamed to lined and sealed landfills. The rest is left on the ground as a potential pollutant, particularly in urban areas.

The average dog poops more per day than the average person. Throw in the tons of plastic we use in a foolhardy attempt to sanitize this absurd process.

Add it up and you find that today U.S. dogs generate more solid waste than the U.S. human population in 1959. Can you imagine an advanced country in 1959 not providing a practical sanitary disposal system that works for its 178 million people? We have a hard time wrapping our heads around that one and hope you do, too.


1959 human population
U.S. Census Bureau, 177,8 million

2016 dog population
U.S. Humane Society, 83 million

Pet waste quantities
Average dog produces .75 lb. of waste per day (U.S. Dept. of Agriculture)

Human waste quantities

On average humans excrete 128 g (.28 lb.) of fresh feces per person per day – Rose, C.; Parker, A.; Jefferson, B.; Cartmell, E. (2015). “The Characterization of Feces and Urine: A Review of the Literature to Inform Advanced Treatment Technology,” 3.1

Dog waste vs. human waste

.28 lbs. human waste per day vs. .75 ave. dog waste per day

2016 U.S. dogs

83 million dogs x .75 lb. waste per day = total 62,250,000 lb. waste per day ÷ 2,000 = 31,215 tons per day
31,215 tons per day x 365 days = 11.4 tons dog waste per year

1959 U.S. humans

177.8 million humans x .28 lb. waste per day = total 49,784,000 lb. per day ÷ 2,000 = 24,900 tons per day
24,900 tons per day x 365 days = 9 million tons per year


Calgary’s Green Cart says “yes” to pet poop

“…when it came to meat bones, shells from seafood, cat and dog poop or just those chicken breasts I never got around to cooking and are starting to grow hair in the fridge, backyard composting has its limits,” writes Licia Corbella in today’s Calgary Herald. “So, imagine my delight when I was granted a special tour of Calgary’s Green Cart Composting Facility in Calgary’s deep southeast near the Shepard Landfill.”

Since the beginning of October, when the citywide residential program was fully engaged, Calgary has seen a 50 per cent reduction in the amount of waste picked up in the black carts, which is transported to the landfill.

Take a peek with Licia.

Perth community accepts pet waste with recycled organics

A select group of residents in the City of Melville, in Perth’s southern suburbs, will soon be able to throw meat, dairy products, coffee grounds, dog poo and kitty litter into their green waste bins. All organic waste from their homes will be accepted into green-lidded bins, which ordinarily only take garden waste like leaves, lawn clippings and small branches.

“It’s going to contain all the organics generated in the household,” Steve Wacher, manager of resource recovery and waste at the City of Melville, told ABC Radio Perth. “You can put all your fruit and vegetables, meat and bones, seafood, bread, dairy, tea and coffee in that bin as well as weeds, plants, tree prunings, small branches, dog poo, kitty litter.”

Compost resulting from organics recycling is used to fertilize local parks.

Read the full story.

Pet parents in India turn dump into dog park…

AND compost waste to fertilize park plants.

 “It’s called the ‘poop pit’ and all dog owners scoop the poop and put it there. The pit is ‘managed’ – with mud added to it to avoid any foul smell and it will also create good manure for the park. 

Bengaluru’s dog owners are extremely conscientious about the environment and about doing the right thing,” he said. Over a 100 volunteers took part in the spotfix.  Full story

Nova Scotia county composts cat litter

Hooray for Pictou County! Ninety-six million U.S. cats generate five million tons of waste (poop plus litter) each year. That amounts to 500,000 dump trucks full of kitty waste annually. The contents of indoor litter boxes is streamed to landfills. Only 4.5 million cats live in Canada. But one Nova Scotia county solid waste department – Pictou County – has a solution…community composting. Read more.

Dog waste to provide electricity for Waterloo homes

Waterloo, Ont.’s new dog poop power pilot project has been the talk of the country this week, with its promise of unleashing pet waste as a renewable energy resource.

Dubbed “poop power” by Mayor Dave Jaworsky, the pilot project starts with three pet waste containers placed in three Waterloo parks, including Bechtel Park, which has a leash-free dog zone.

Continue reading…

Brooklyn dog park now upcycling poo

“Dog waste in and of itself doesn’t have any value…so we decided to create value out of it by upcycling it to fertilizer,” Leslie Wright of the New York State Parks Department said.

A pilot program at Williamsburg East River State Park is testing the feasibility of on-site dog waste composting using scoopers and cedar bins. See the CBSNY post.