All posts in “compost pet poop”

Summer is the time to start recycling pet poo

With 83 million dogs and 96 million cats in the U.S. alone, pet waste is a serious problem, polluting land and waterways and contributing upwards of 10 million tons of material to landfills every year. For years we’ve been told not to recycle dog and cat waste. But the fact is that, with due diligence, there are many ways to take your pet to near zero waste by diverting his or her waste from landfills.

Find ways to significantly reduce household waste by recycling your pet’s waste via The Pet Poo Guide: How to Compost and Recycle Pet Waste, a must-read for pet owners concerned about the environmental impact of their best friend. This book offers step-by-step instructions for eight ways to recycle and practical advice on choosing which one is the best solution for you.

The Pet Poo Guide: How to Compost and Recycle Pet Waste is now available online and at area book stores.   Are you ready to nudge your pets much, much closer to net zero waste?  Order your copy of the Guide today at Amazon, New Society Publishers, Lybrary.com ebooks or your favorite book store.

Progress on Colorado In-vessel dog waste tumbler

EnviroWagg is customizing a 40-ft. in-vessel tumbler to begin composting dog waste in an enclosed unit. We recently added a new auger and entry chute. An ALLU screening bucket recently arrived on site. This new equipment will break up compostable bags used at the dog parks and screen out any debris left in public disposal bins designated for dog waste. Opening the bags will enable air, moisture and helpful aerobic microbes to process our source material into a safe and productive soil amendment. By the end of 2016 we expect to have finished compost for evaluation. Composting keeps dog waste out of sealed landfills, reduces the volume by 50% and results in a nutrient-rich garden soil.

Composting also reduces methane emissions. Landfill methane is produced because organic materials sealed in a landfill undergo anaerobic decomposition. Basically, this means that because municipal solid waste that is buried in a landfill does not receive oxygen, it will be degraded by microbes that produce methane. A compost pile, on the other hand, undergoes aerobic decomposition. Because it is exposed to oxygen and degraded by a different type of living organisms, composting material produces CO2 (carbon dioxide) instead of methane.

Halifax collects pet waste with other compostables

Halifax and other nearby Canadian municipalities require residents to toss compostables into clear bags so that collectors ensure that items meet composting criteria.  New rules ask Halifax clients to deposit pet waste loose or in small clear plastic bags.  “This requirement rankles many Halifax dog owners because the municipality’s suggestion to use see-through poop bags such as baggies means they’re tossing non-biodegradable bags in the landfill.”